The one about…comparison.

“Don’t worry about what he’s doing, just enjoy what you’re doing and let him do his thing!”

I listened to the advice I was giving to my squabbling children and laughed to myself at my own inability to follow it!

I’m good at comparison, which sucks because it doesn’t actually do me any good. It destroys any healthy perspective I have of my own life and skews the view the lives of those around me. It seems I’m often unable to see the awesome truths about my own world because I’m so busy looking at everyone else’s. It’s almost as if the more I compare the more I need to compare until I find a comparison that makes me feel better about myself!

I’d love to live from a place of security, knowing that I was good enough, clever enough, pretty enough, successful enough, rich enough; that who I was and all I had was enough. Regardless of how that measured up to Facebook, Instagram, my neighbours or even my husband; whatever scale I’m currently choosing to compare my life to! Imagine if I was able to live life content with who I am and what I have.

I often wonder why I have a problem with comparison. Maybe it’s a simple lack of self esteem or maybe it’s born out of dissatisfaction with where my life is at. I had a friend share a quote she’d heard which basically said “dissatisfaction is key to our evolution” and I guess maybe there’s something about a state of discontent that does drive us forward into new things. I guess it’s OK to be discontent with how things are and allow that to inspire change, that must be different from a comparison to how others are which makes you want to change?

It seems that so often I live life from a place of lack or scarcity rather than abundance and generosity. The religion I grew up with started from a point of lack, loss, failure and separation; as though humanity was birthed into scarcity. Stories of generosity and extravagance had been retold focussing on what was lost or what was missing. The role of religion was generally to remind you that you weren’t enough, that you lacked something; that ultimately you had fallen short of perfection and weren’t good enough for God! What I’m learning is that actually true religion starts from a place of extravagance, prodigality, abundance and generosity. I’m slowly realising that there’s a force, an energy, a Divine Spirit at work in the universe which cries out “I am always with you and all I have is yours”, that phrase echoes through creation, it’s evident in every season, which means that I don’t need to worry about having enough or being enough because there is always enough. It’s not just material wealth like money and possessions that I become fearful or possessive about but also love and joy and fun and laughter. What if I’m reluctant to celebrate the success and happiness of others because deep within I believe that there’s a limit to the amount of joy there is to go around? What if I’m jealous of the success of others because in some strange way I think that their success restricts the success that might come my way! Sounds a little crazy?! Maybe, but why else would I feel a little envious that they got to buy that house together, or that he got that job, or that she gets to go to that party? What is it that stops me being simply happy for others in their moments of excitement and happiness? If I genuinely begin to believe in a benevolent universe, a Divine being that is totally for humanity, then my need to compare or measure myself against others will diminish because I’ll know that I have access to all I need and that I am enough!

That’s my bag! But as a wise person said earlier this week:

The particular is always universal, it’s like you’re hearing this person talk about the situation they’re in and you realise ‘oh lots of people know what this is about’, it’s like if you go far enough into yourself you find everybody!*

So while this is where I’m at, maybe it’s not just me!

*Rob Bell on The Robcast Episode 231: An Anatomy of Restlesness!

The one about…Prodigal Collective!

Prodigal Collective; it’s happening, right now, intrigued?! I am!!

For those of you who have followed my ramblings in recent months you’ll know that over the summer we as family experimented with church. We talked and laughed and listened and drew pictures and built duplo and ran around with no clothes on (that was just the 2 year old) all in an attempt to try to be church, to try to understand a little more about church. Since then the routine of school and the “normal” demands of life have taken over but Sid and I have continued to journey deeper into the idea of church. We have written a vision; an idea; a framework for what we think it could be, because we think church, if that is indeed the right word for it, more than ever is needed in the world. “Church” offers something to humanity that we as human beings crave, it offers a ‘way of being’ in the world, a way of making sense of what is, and a source of hope for what could be. It is a place where conversation can begin but shouldn’t end because we don’t claim to have all the answers.

Out of this Prodigal Collective is emerging!

Prodigal a Collective is a movement; tribe; community which seeks to connect people to themselves, others and the Divine.
We are prodigal by name and prodigal by nature. We believe there is an extravagant, generous, abundant, benevolent universe which is totally for humanity. Therefore, we desire to be an extravagantly reckless people who love who they are and extend that love to others.
We are inspired by the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ and believe His story speaks of what it is to be human.
In light of all this, we at Prodigal, are attempting to create a space where meaning can be given to that which we know to be true but can’t always voice, a space where ideas of who we really are and who the Divine might be, can find expression. We want that space to be a place where we celebrate life in all its fullness, where we stand with each other and our communities through the good and the bad and where we acknowledge the gift that it is to be alive.

We recognise that’s a way of describing “church” but we also know that it’s very theoretical, more of an ideology than an actual phenomenon. So we began to play around with what it might look like in reality and we came up with a few more words, which strangely (or not) when put together create a kind of energy that begins to gather speed, a momentum that draws others in with ideas and words and pictures and stories because this whole thing is about giving meaning to something so much bigger than anything we’ve ever experienced.

connect
connect with others, meet up, chat, hang out, integrate, laugh, talk, listen, cry, get together, understand, learn, forgive, connect with ourselves, stop, listen, see, wait, cry, pause, laugh, draw, write, paint, think, be.
encounter
god, the divine, the source of life, the universe, the infinite, the ground of being, force, spirit, mystery, wonder, soul, something more, something beyond, something deeper, meaning, story, experience, life.
share
life, food, possessions, stuff, time, energy, be there, walk, run, have coffee, include, cook a meal, give a gift, cut the grass, do the shopping, walk the dog, feed the cat, grab a pint, together.

In practice we’ll set up school/sports/community chaplaincy, we’ll offer care to the members of our community at times of loneliness, isolation or loss. We’ll look for ways to bring families together, to celebrate life, there’ll be tots groups, parenting courses and other activities. We’ll gather together over food, music, and film, we’ll learn together, express gratitude, be encouraged and experience that ‘something more’ we can’t always define! Prodigal will share, as much as we can, as often as we can! We still don’t know where this expression will find it’s place in the world but it is definitely growing. We have a Facebook page called ‘Prodigal Collective’ and our very own YouTube channel called, erm, ‘Prodigal Collective’… we’re in the process of creating a website (we’re not sure what that’ll be called…just kidding!) We’re inviting you to join the adventure alongside us, to help us write the story that is ‘Prodigal’. At this point that means checking out our pages, offering feedback and suggestions, getting word out and looking for ways to ‘be Prodigal’ in this awesome world in which we live. So good!

The one about…the real Jesus?

People often describe him as a good man, regardless of belief in his divinity or the resurrection. There is something compelling about him, people were drawn to him 2000 years ago and talk of what he said and did has continued for centuries. His existence as a good moral teacher is widely recognised, in fact in the last week or so, I’ve had two people say he had a good moral code or words to that effect. But did he? Were his stories, actions and behaviour morally acceptable?! Or is there a case for an immoral Jesus!?

It’s probably important at this point to define the word “moral”, so a quick Google exploration reveals the definition as:

standards of behaviour; principles of right and wrong

So Jesus had good standards of behaviour? He held to high principles of proper conduct? Did he? I’m not convinced!

Jesus spoke to women, talked to them as if they were interesting, as if they had value. The thing was that in first century Palestine women were not valued outside of the home, they had their place, at home! Zhava Glaser, an expert in Jewish history writes:

By publicly including women in his ministry, Jesus shattered the prejudicial customs of his day. Why was it unusual for Jesus to speak with women? Nothing in the Mosaic Law prevented men and women from conversing with one another! Yet the society of Jesus’ day, with custom dictated by rabbinic Judaism, differed strikingly from the Old Testament social order…women were not allowed to testify in court. In effect, this categorized them with Gentiles, minors, deaf-mutes and “undesirables” such as gamblers, the insane, usurers, and pigeon-racers, who were also denied that privilege.

It wasn’t just women that Jesus’ engagement with was questionable; one of his disciples, one of the people closest to him, was a tax collector. Tax collectors were Jews who worked for the Roman Empire, the oppressive regime occupying the Jewish land. Tax collectors collaborated with this evil force, they took money from fellow Jews and gave it to the Romans, actions seen as somewhat traitorous. Tax collectors kept money for themselves so were also known to be liars and cheats, untrustworthy individuals, not people to befriend. So to hang out with tax collectors was also questionable behaviour.

I’m reading a fascinating book* about Jewish culture in the time of Jesus, the author describes Jesus’ interactions with tax collectors:

“Imagine, for instance, how it would of felt to follow Jesus through the door of Matthews house, eating with tax collectors, sinners who were considered the stooges of Rome…for the disciples to eat with such despicable men would of been scandalous.”

That’s who Jesus ate with, laughed with…maybe his morals should be in question! It wasn’t just who he ate with, it was also the stories he told about who shared meals; like the father who prepared a feast for the son who’d wished him dead, or the story about the great feast which some guests refused an invitation to which ‘the poor, the crippled, the blind and the lame on the street’ were instead invited, people you wouldn’t eat with, people who wouldn’t eat together! Eating together was significant.

“Jeramias notes that in the east, even today, to invite someone to a meal was to extend an honour, an offering of peace, trust, forgiveness. Jesus meals with sinners weren’t merely social revenues or just signs of his empathy for the lowly, though he was compassionate. “*

Did Jesus take compassion too far? He allowed a prostitute to pour oil over his feet, and wipe them with her hair…imagine it, a prostitute? Really?

His compassion also extended to Samaritans both in person and in parable. He talked with a Samaritan woman at the well and he told the now very famous story of the ‘Good Samaritan’, as Rob Bell identifies, the phrase good Samaritan was an “impossibility”!**

The Samaritans were hated by the Jews, considered unclean as half Jew/ half Gentile(non Jewish) people with their own understanding of Jewish law and their own expression of worship, the division went back hundreds of years. So this story of the good Samaritan was ‘brilliant, clever, subversive’!**

Jesus taunted, almost mocked the Pharisees, the keepers of the law. He provoked them with his radical teaching and he worked on the Sabbath. He was accused of blasphemy, his seemingly immoral behaviour and constant challenge to the religious system and those who ran it, along with his refusal to conform to the empire which occupied the land all led to his death! Just a good bloke? I’m not so sure!

These are not the actions of just another good moral teacher, they are more the actions of a subversive rebel. Jesus would probably be more at home on ‘Have I got news for you?’ than ‘Songs of praise’! What if so many of us miss the revolutionary, radical, controversial teaching of this first century Rabbi! What if far too easily Jesus gets written off as a long haired, Swedish looking hippie with some good ideas rather than the religious and political threat he actually was? What if that’s why they killed him?

So where does that leave us? Do we keep Jesus locked in a box with the Tooth Fairy, Father Christmas and the Easter Bunny (that would make a fab film!?) Do we write him off as a historical figure of some note but now not so relevant? Do we place him on a golden cross at a safe distance and respectfully bow the knee? Or do we find a way to re-read what he taught, seeing it for the life giving, energizing, hope filled news that it was and actually still is? Do we allow what he said, how he lived, who he was to shape who we are and how we live today? Could his questionable moral actions 2000 years ago have significantly shaped morality of society today? Do we acknowledge that within all the Jesus talk, there is mystery and wonder and awe? Do we acknowledge that within us, all those things exist too because that’s part of what it means to be human? What if there there really is something to the whole Jesus thing?

*Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus, Ann Spangler and Lois Tverberg.

**What is the Bible? Rob Bell.

The one about…the prodigal pine cone!

Did you know that pine trees produce male and female pinecones? The female cones carry the seeds, and each female seedcone has two seeds in each of its scales…I tried to count the scales, there are a lot! There are a lot of pine cones on a tree (although apparently they take 2-3 years to grow so a tree never sheds all its pine cones at once!)…that said, that’s a lot of seeds from one tree! Pine trees are prodigal with seeds…doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue does it but there’s something about that word ‘PRODIGAL’…
prod·i·gal

adjective

1. spending money or using resources freely and recklessly; wastefully extravagant.

2. Having or giving something on a lavish scale.

Nature is prodigal, it’s also messy but it’s more than just mess, it’s lavish and extravagant and bountiful…which can also seem wasteful and excessive and imprudent! There’s something about the mess that is extravagantly excessive!

Yet we so often forget that the forces which surround us, whether we see that as a force of nature or a divine force, are excessive and bountiful and extravagant. Instead we live with scarcity.

Lynne Twist, in her book called ‘The Soul of Money’ writes

For me, and for many of us, our first waking thought of the day is “I didn’t get enough sleep.” The next one is “I don’t have enough time.” Whether true or not, that thought of not enough occurs to us automatically before we even think to question or examine it… before we even sit up in bed, before our feet touch the floor, we’re already inadequate, already losing, already lacking something. And by the time we go to bed at night, our minds are reaching with a litany of what we get, or didn’t get done, that day….This internal condition of scarcity lives at the very heart of our jealousy, our greed, our prejudices, and our arguments with life…(pg 43-45)

Scarcity; restricted quantity, not enough, shortage, lack…those are the beliefs that permeate our culture! We’re constantly bombarded with messages that tell us time is running out, that encourage us to ‘get it before it’s gone’ or taunt us with that ‘once in a lifetime opportunity’…we stock up for Christmas even though shops are only closed for a day or we start shopping in September because the shelves are full and whispering to us that we’ll not get it all done in time!

If it’s not time that’s scarce then it’s resources, or hope, or joy. Have you ever been in a conversation where it seems as though the other person is trying to out do you on how busy they’ve been or how hard their day was? Like the scene from Notting Hill where they try to prove they have the ‘saddest act’ to get the last brownie. There’s something about a ‘being hard done by’ attitude that is fed by feelings of scarcity because the flip side is celebration of all there is and all we have. It’s as though scarcity feeds some kind of fear. This fear tells us that if I actually admit I’m happy, excited, joyful it might change or the fear suggests that this moment might be part of my happiness quota so I’d best not waste it on enjoying doing homework with the kids!

It seems we’re good at scarcity which is maybe why there’s a story in the bible, often called the prodigal son. The son is prodigal because he takes his inheritance before his father dies and wastes it on ‘wild living’ (whatever that is?!). He’s reckless and excessive, and so eventually the money goes and with it the friends he’d made until he’s left feeding pigs (not the top job in Jewish culture!!). The son ‘comes to his senses’ and returns to his father, ready with a speech about how wrong he’s been and how he doesn’t deserve anything…but the father, the prodigal father, lavishes gifts and unstinting celebration on his returning son.

It’s a feel good story of forgiveness and welcome and generosity… (although the actual ending is a bit obscure; there’s a jealous older brother who’s reluctant to accept the prodigals and we’re not told the outcome of that!) The story would of played havoc with the culture of the day, was Jesus actually suggesting that God could be that reckless and extravagant and excessive??

The thing is, all of creation points to a God that is just that, a God, a force, a power that gives without measure, that suggests there is enough to go around and that time is eternal…this power, this force invites us in to a flow, or a dance of extravagance rather than scarcity, of celebration rather than fear, of generosity rather than greed, of life rather than death. We’re invited to come to our senses!

What if we choose to believe this truth? What if that leads us to be people who enjoy the moment rather than endure it? What if we’re people who dare to admit we’ve had a good day rather than list all the occasions where it was a bit full on? What if we’re people who look for the opportunities within our hectic schedules to enjoy all that there is and in doing so realise that some things can wait? What if believing there is enough in our world for everyone means we genuinely start to look for opportunities to share more fairly? What if believing there isn’t a lack means we don’t need to stockpile at the expense of others because we will all get a share? What if somewhere in the extravagance of the pinecone there’s an invitation to life in all it’s fullness, to a life of richness and meaning that’s not based on material wealth but on an unending supply of all that we really need!

The one about…what we forgot!

There are reminders all around us of a truth we’ve forgotten, the truth that the very essence of who we are is good. The truth that the centre of our being is holy, right and beautiful. Autumn brings these reminders to us in such generous proportions as the air freshens and the trees shout of the faithfulness of the universe! The conkers are starting to fall and I feel a strange kind of awe, I watch the children as they find creative ways of breaking the unopened outer cases to reveal the shiny, smooth conker inside! It’s a reminder of the beauty that creation holds, a reminder that there’s goodness within all that’s created, no matter how spiky the outer appearance!

Yet so often we don’t see the goodness, and sadly much of Christian teaching suggests we’re not good enough, that we failed before we even began, it’s the doctrine of original sin; it haunts us and inhibits our ability to be fully alive. Even if we don’t subscribe to a religion, or that strand of one, there is a whisper around us that we are not enough; not successful/thin/wealthy/fit/popular/clever/________ enough! This belief, whatever angle it is approached from, is damaging.

It has damaged our relationship with the divine. God is seen by many as a wrathful figure who needs appeasing. There are even hymn lyrics to that effect! The death of Jesus becomes about changing the mind of God about humanity rather than the ultimate act of love that changed the mind of humanity about God!*

It’s not only our understanding of the divine that has been skewed; the idea that we are sinful from birth, or that we are not good enough, has implications for our relationship with others from a personal to an international level. If we submit to the doctrine of original sin or the lies of ‘not enough’ then we don’t trust the fundamental goodness of the other instead we fear, judge and often hate simply because we can’t see deep enough to see the truth.

The teaching of original sin and the lies of not enough also damage our relationship with ourselves, we begin to really believe we’re not good and to compensate we fill our lives with things that makes us feel better about ourselves, anything that holds meaning, even if the meaning isn’t rooted in truth. We try to prove to ourselves, others, even a higher being, that who we are, what we have and what we’ve achieved is acceptable. I talked with a friend who told me of an elderly lady, who on her death bed did not feel ‘good enough’ for what was coming next, which suggested she’d never discovered the truth about herself; that she is good.

What if the Jesus story is a reminder of the truth that we are good? What if the teaching of Jesus is, at it’s very heart a call back to our true self? What if Jesus speaks of a different way because the way we so often choose isn’t good for us, isn’t the way of the soul? What if religion, at it’s very essence, is about reminding us of this truth? What if religion is about creating ways for us to step aside from the lies we’ve come to believe and actually connect with who we really are. Sid found this quote:

Religion:
The root, ‘re ligio’ (latin) rebinding re-ligamenting is not doing its job if it only reminds you of your distance, your unworthiness, your sinfulness, and your inadequacy before God’s greatness.

Reconnect
re = again
ligare = connect

What if our understanding of Jesus; of church or of our religion, has the ability to reconnect us with the truth about ourselves? What if the Jesus story offers us the truth about all we have ever been, all we are and all we can be. Truth that says “we are enough”. A truth that has been forgotten but a truth that calls to us in the most unlikely of places.

There’s a Jennifer Lopez song called ‘Feel the Light’, used in the movie “Home”…

Feel the light
Shining in the dark of night
Remember what we forgot
I know it’s a long shot
But we’re bringing it all back
We’re bringing it all back
Feel the light
Shining like the stars tonight
Remember what we forgot
I know it’s a long shot
But we’re bringing i
t all back

There’s something so deep, so mysterious to remembering ‘what we forgot’. There is a light that shines into our story, even in the darkest of moments, that reminds us of who we are, that brings it all back and allows us the opportunity to re-imagine religion, reconnect with ourselves, and restore a right understanding of the divine. There’s a call to return home. There is also something about a reclamation of orginal goodness that could change our world!

*A Richard Rohr quote and then lots of thoughts inspired by J.P.Newell’s book ‘Christ of the Celts’- worth a read!

The one about…resurrection.

I read a book while we were away…well, when I say “read a book” it was more a case of having a book in my hand and trying to get through a sentence whilst juggling the demands of a potty training two year old, a very creative(!?!) four year old and an emotional seven year old at the same time as ensuring the rest of the family were fed and watered when they did reappear back at the camper!

The book in question was called “Practising Resurrection”…the title intrigued me because I’ve thought more about the death thing than resurrection, not necessarily actual physical death, more the metaphorical kind of death like the death of plans, or hopes, or dreams; the death of relationships or friendships or the nagging feeling that life, energy or meaning are draining away and you’re not sure what comes next…that kind of death!

I guess to some extent that’s why I find the church concept so intriguing…’death’ is all around us and it manifests itself in many ways. I want to believe that church has something to offer. The Jesus story is one where death is defeated and resurrection reigns. Jesus is about resurrection, the bible is full of stories about restoration and redemption. I guess the question is so what!? What difference does the resurrection make? What do restoration, redemption and resurrection look like in our world now? What does the church have to say into all of this?! There are so many questions…

Does the resurrection make a difference to the tired and tearful mum who has totally lost sight of who she is among the demands of her growing family? Does the resurrection make a difference to the guy whose wife of fifty years died a week ago and he’s not sure what he’s going to do now? Does the resurrection make a difference to the woman whose husband walked out and now she’s left with a future that looks very different to the one she’d imagined they’d have? Does the resurrection make a difference to the boy whose exam results weren’t quite what everyone expected and now he’s not sure the options he’s being given are anything he really wants to do? Does the resurrection make a difference to the guy who has just been made redundant because the role he’s trained to do just isn’t needed in the same way anymore? Does the resurrection make a difference to the mum and dad who have just had their thirty eight year old sons life support machine turned off?

There’s death in all of those stories. Endings that no one saw coming, or even if they did, it turned out they weren’t as prepared for it as they thought. A finality that hurts, that breaks us in ways we didn’t think we were capable of being broken. A wake up call to our own vulnerability, fragility and mortality. Death is painful, whatever form it takes.

The Jesus story speaks into our encounters with death, it reminds us that death is real. It shows us how death can be respected, honoured, or at the very least acknowledged. There’s something about naming it, about mourning, about letting the tears fall and the pain be felt that helps us to connect with that moment and allow it to simply be…for a while unresolved, unfixed, just what it is.

Jesus surrenders to it, he allows death to do its thing. Maybe there’s a wisdom to the surrender, a wisdom to allowing death to ‘be’ because we know that death does not have the last word. It might have a lot to say, it might linger for longer than we would like it to but the Jesus story, and many of our own ‘death’ stories show us that it is not the end.

As we follow the Jesus story we see that death does not hold Jesus, the tomb is empty. We read of his friends, some who accept their encounter with death and almost immediately see the new possibilities, running to share the news. We read of other friends who remain for longer in the death moment, still wondering what it might mean, uncertain how or even who they’re going to be now everything’s changed. We see others who can’t move forward, paralysed by fear or doubt or pain, needing to know the gentle encouragement of someone they trust before they can tentatively take another step.

In each case however there is hope, there are glimmers of something new emerging and a faint whisper of hope murmuring within.

For me, hope is what the Jesus story offers, it’s what the church should offer; the idea of ‘Practicing Resurrection’ as Cris Rogers describes:

“The very way Jesus would be able to reveal his resurrection to the (Roman) empire and to the world was through his church. This church was a group of people who had experienced the resurrection and now were calling others into it.” Practicing Resurrection; page 104

As church we call others into the hope of resurrection life. As church we practice finding those glimmers of new life. So for the mum who feels she’s not coping there’s the realisation that there are gradually more good moments than there are bad ones as she shares life with a friend who just listens; or for the boy with the exam results a new idea offered, one that had never even been considered; for those who hoped to be living out their days with that person they’re no longer with, for whatever reason, a new story begins to take shape and new relationships emerge or old relationships find a new expression; for the couple who’ve said goodbye to their son, they find a way of remembering and celebrating what was as they create a new way of being in the world, as they delicately tread a path they’d hoped they’d never have to walk…resurrection isn’t always realised immediately!

The resurrection offers hope into our own stories of death. Somehow, as we live through the myriad of metaphorical death experiences and share the stories of the new life emerging, the stories of restoration, of renewal, of relationships restored and life rekindled; we find resurrection to be a reality. As we embrace the knowledge that we can be refreshed, renewed and re-envisioned we begin to believe that resurrection is true. Resurrection becomes the reality that we see faithfully played out in our everyday, a practice so intertwined in how we live that when we face our final day we know that death is not the end, it’s the beginning of something new.

The one about…church (part 5 – it’s definitely headed somewhere!)

We continued our exploration into church this week, as a family…all nine of us sat around the dining table (I think it was possibly the sight of chocolate mini eggs that did it but hey, whatever works!!)

We’ve been on quite a journey, beginning with the concept of church as community but realising that community exists in many guises and we can tap into it in spheres other than church. So it was suggested that church was perhaps a community where we encountered God; but when we probed more deeply into that we discovered that actually we encountered God in all sorts of places, activities and experiences. So we wondered if church was more the place where the stories were shared and the encounters encouraged! The question then became “for what purpose?” Why do we need to share stories and be encouraged?

As family we talked about the beginnings of church and “the Way” of Jesus, about living a lifestyle that in some way honoured the teachings of Jesus but an awkward kind of silence fell as we tried to understand what that looked like…”well, being kind I think” said one and “love, that must have something to do with it” mused another?! Well it’s a start!!!

I guess for our story, as we try to work out how to be church and are in the privileged, scary yet exciting position of finding a church to lead, the thoughts we’re exploring are huge. We recognise that there are elements of existing church that just don’t connect anymore. Some churches have lost sight of the revolutionary, upside down, counter cultural teachings of Jesus…so the idea of being a church that really explores what it means to be human while experiencing the divine is actually interesting! A church that encourages lives to be radically different to the way of the world because it knows that what the world offers is not enough and it doesn’t last; a church that looks for something that holds those bigger questions about who we are and why we’re here and offers a forum for talking that through! That’s where I think this conversation about church is headed!

There is, alongside all of this, an awareness that church through the centuries has included elements of prayer, song, sacrament and teaching in a variety of expressions! Maybe there’s something about humanity trying to express a connection to that ‘thing that is outside of themselves’ that requires more than the limited language we have. There’s something about connection to the divine that goes beyond our regular human expression of ourselves. When we express our souls we often find words are inadequate and that music, art, even ritual are a more faithful articulation.

There also seems to be something about how humanity functions within groups or systems, something about how we as humans create structure and ritual no matter what culture or tribe we’re part of. Maybe as a way of associating meaning and purpose to who we are and what we’re doing!

I’d been thinking about this blog all week and we drove home after visiting friends in Dartford, we sat in traffic waiting to enter the Blackwall Tunnel and spotted this sign:

“Traditions are important in neighbourhoods so let’s invent some”

Traditions like the village show, the school fete or the scarecrow festival…(I imagine you’ve lived places with their own community tradition). Tradition exists in neighbourhood and in family too. Most families invent rhythm, tradition and even ritual; structures that allow mornings, meal times and bed time to flow; traditions that enable the celebrations of Christmas or birthdays or other ‘holidays’, as well as rituals that mark significant life events.

Sporting groups also create fascinating ritual that we just take for granted! I observed Dover Athletic fans arriving to watch a game, dressed in scarves and tops associated to their team. They enter the ground, take their seat(most likely in the same seat as the previous game!) snd observe the players carrying out their own pre-match routine. The same routine each game of lining up, shaking hands, tossing a coin. The match kicks off, there are songs sung, chants that echo around the ground; at half time the obligatory pie is purchased and the second half is enjoyed (or not – depending on the teams performance!!). Together they encourage each other as they worship their sporting heroes! The whole experience is full of rhythm, ritual and tradition.

It seems that most groups and communities create systems that provide structure, comfort and security. Church seems to be no different.

However, there has to be a purpose to those routines and rituals. Something more than just comfort and security! There’s something about making a difference for good in the world; about making connections beyond ourselves and our immediate friends and family. Those rituals need to extend into care for others; those we don’t know or understand, as well as those who our lifestyles inadvertently impact through the every day choices we make. As we realise who we are actually in relationship with we discover a greater care and responsibility for our neighbourhood, our towns and ultimately the planet. As we explore this we learn what love really looks like as well as who and what that love impacts!

Within all of these thoughts is a challenge to grow, shape or simply be church…to invite others to join in and together find the expressions and conversations that allow those involved to be fully alive. You could give your whole life for that!